Want to publish that novel? Moi aussi, allons-y!

I have a long history of starting stories, and never really finishing them. I started writing my first ‘proper’ book when I was 18. It was called Evie and featured a university-aged girl who wakes up five years in the future – a future in which all her dreams have come true. Turns out she has amnesia – or does she really?

I’m not going to lie, I thought Evie was the best thing since sliced bread. The truth? It’s pretty atrocious and it will never, ever see the light of day. It was filled with empty characters, shallow themes and was drowning with so many clichés that it would probably get flagged for plagiarism. I really had no clue how to write a book.

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It took me five more years before I mustered up the courage to write another novel-length story. It’s sobering to think I started my second novel, Mesmerise, in August 2015 – more than two years ago! I had so many grand plans. Plans to make it a trilogy. Plans to write and self-publish 3-4 books a year. Plans to be a full-time writer by now.

I’m not exactly sure why my ‘self-publishing’ enthusiasm died off. It could have been all the rejection. What right do I have to publish my own books when no one in the industry thinks they’re up to scratch? Will I ever be taken seriously as a writer if I decide to go down the indie route?

It also could have been about the money. I’ve talked to a few authors who self-publish, and they always, always maintain that you should get your novels professionally edited before you publish them – and I have to agree. Sadly, at the moment I can’t really afford to get my novels edited.

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I will admit that the above are all just excuses. The publishing industry is highly subjective and while the ‘Big 5’ are indeed the gatekeepers to prestige, they are not the sole gatekeepers to success. Many writers who were rejected by the traditional publishers, go on to have successful writing careers. And the money? If I really tried, I’m sure I could scrimp and save and get the required $500 – $800 for a basic copy and line edit.

There’s only one real reason why I haven’t achieved my goals yet.

I’m a complete and utter wuss.

It’s such a big step throwing your novel out into the nether and hoping it sticks. I’ve heard (many times over from those who have gone before) about the herculean effort that is required just to get your novels ready for publication, this is not including all the marketing (and myriad of other things) you’ll need to do as a self-published author. No wonder I’ve been putting it off and doing anything and everything under the sun other than publishing my novels.

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Believe it or not, this year, I’ve decided I’m going to take charge and publish my novels.

Yes, I really am. I think.

Starting with Mesmerise in April.

I don’t have a specific date yet (you guys will be the first to know!) but my rough plan looks something like this:

  • Major edit (I’ve recently made a few more big changes)
  • Go through a second round of beta-readers
  • Professional edit
  • Final proof read
  • Figure out how the hell to self-publish
  • PUBLISH!!
  • Celebrate with wine
  • Have a party
  • Drink more wine

There will probably be a few more steps in there, but hey, this is all my brain can cope with right now. I’m just going to focus on editing Mesmerise for the 29th time, and then I’ll start the beta-reading process again.

If you’re going through the same thing as me, suffering through a serious case of wussiness, than hopefully we can get through this slump together. If becoming a published author has been your lifelong dream, why not let 2018 be the year it comes true?

Self-publishing is not an easy route to take, clearly, but just imagine how awesome it will be when you finally publish that novel. Feel the heavy weight of it in your hands, glide your palm over the front cover and use your thumb to flip through the pages. Now wasn’t all that hard work worth it?

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95 thoughts

  1. I began writing my first novel last year but what with high school and tests every month I rarely get the time to put my pen to paper. I’m really hoping for some feedback and I’ve put the first nine chapters up on my blog but it’s not getting much traffic (not to mention the novel itself might be really bad). 😛
    This post was helpful! Good luck to you!

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  2. I relate to this so hard! I had 3 years at uni working on my first novel. Stopping and starting. Scraping out 10K words and then starting all over. Almost purely because of chickening out! I’ve spent the past 2 months trying to figure out what’s wrong with the story and now I want to try again with the hope of finishing it this year and getting it published! Then there’s all my side stories but we won’t go there haha! Good luck with your book!
    Natalie x
    https://parchmentandpencils.com/

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  3. Hi Milly. My dad decided to self-publish his book, which was a biography of a canoeist –it was a specialty title of interest to a group of readers who all subscribed to the same canoeing magazine. The book was a success, and my dad felt very proud to say he had made some money on it. I often wonder where he got the bravery to self-publish a book on a rather esoteric subject, especially since it was his first work and he was, I think, around 70 years old at the time.

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  4. This is very encouraging! I’m giving up with “professionals” and moving on to rely on myself for my first novel as well! I can’t wait to read your book! Hopefully then the professionals will realize that we are total badasses with an intelligence.

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  5. This is so relatable! In terms of goals that I want to achieve in the coming future, writing a novel is ‘write’ up there but the struggles are real.
    I have absolutely no idea in which to approach the whole writing scenario which really demotivates me even more!
    All the best with ‘Mesmerize’. Hoping its the start of many to come. 🙂

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  6. Hahaha, oh my god how those first two paragraphs resonated with me. I wrote my first novel when I was 16 (9 years ago!) – the first of a four part series called ‘Forza Academy’ that was the absolute worst Harry Potter knock off in history. My Mom was the only one to read it and she told me it was amazing (shocking, I know). Well… I stumbled on the manuscript 5 years later and could not stop laughing as I read it. When I confronted her, she admitted it was awful – “But you were only 16! It was impressive that you’d written it at all. I didn’t want to discourage you.”

    Well she succeeded in not discouraging me and here I am 5 books later, starting the first major revision of a story I think I will finally publish, self or traditional (who knows?). I’m so excited about this one.

    If you really believe in Mesmerize then put it out there! It’ll be a lot of work (which I’m dreading myself), but it’ll be worth it. It might even pique the interest of an agent who will want to take on your subsequent books. And I know I’ll personally give it a read!

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  7. I’m actually surprised that an agent hasn’t picked you up, with all the activity on your blog. Whenever I’m rejected (a.k.a. often), they seem to tell me it is due to social media silence. Are you drawing their attention here?

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  8. Careful when choosing an editor; I have used one who is thorough and confronting (and very reasonably priced) but also one who made literally only 20 inline comments in 278 pages, and always just said what he thought I want to hear. You want the former, especially when being brave enough to self-publish.

    The problem with hiring one’s own editor is that you are still the boss; you are free to ignore his or her feedback, and keep that lame character in the book, because she reminds you of your Mum (or whomever). When a publisher’s editor is in charge, your book doesn’t go to press until it will sell (in their opinion, of course). I’m not very good at this, but my advice is to treat whichever editor you hire like “the boss;” a good one will allow you to consult on disagreements several times, as part of their price, but if they stick to an opinion, then you have to make the change.

    Back when I was still posting, I made this post about choosing my own editor, if it helps.

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  9. Best of luck! I too want to publish that novel, but my wussiness extends beyond the scope of not letting others read my work because– I can’t even read my work. That is, my first draft has yet to be finished! 😢😞 That is my goal for this year, and from there… publishing (one way or the other). Meep!

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  10. Omg, Milly, I’ve literally just put up a post today about my own intention to self-publish this year. Would love to compare notes and be cheerleaders for each other! I too don’t have a lot of money to spend, but I’ve decided that my two essentials are: 1) a manuscript assessment by a professional editor, and 2) a good cover design. Your book only gets one launch and you want to make it the best it can be!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Yay!!! I’m so excited to hear this!! We will definitely have to compare notes 🙂 You can use my ‘contact me’ page if you like, it goes straight to my email, and if I reply from there you should get mine too. I’m doing the same thing, I’m focusing on the editing/proofreading and the cover design. I have a few author friends who have self-published before, and they’ve directed me to some great editors and cover designers so I think I’ll definitely fork out the money to get those things done 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I think they’re definitely the most important areas to focus on – if they’re not done well, the reader is unlikely to come back for more. I know I ALWAYS judge a book by its cover anyway! That’s great that you know people you can trust to point you in the right direction, that will be such a help. And I will definitely get in touch via your contact page!

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  11. I have a Memoir which needs the first edit. You’ve encouraged me to at least set myself the deadline for April 2018. All the best with your plans to publish! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Hurray! I think all your stories or novels deserve to see the light of day. Bad or not, it’s something you thought up and put your heart into. This year I’ve decided to kind of make a “comeback” I tried to publish a book a few years ago with an Indie Publisher who drug me through the mud and I drug through court. It hurt me a lot and after that I became depressed and felt like my work wasn’t worth another effort. It’s taken me time, but I’ve decided to get back into this year. Professional editing, hiring illustrators and most importantly JUST TAKING THE RISK! I look forward to your journey! 🙂 Good Luck!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Hi Millie,
    Having sent my novel to agents without success, I’m now researching self-publishing options. Personally, I’m not going to waste money on a professional edit. Why? Well, two reasons. The first is that it’s my guess that if you were to pay for a professional to edit your book, and then send the edited version to another editor, they would make just as many changes as the first editor, quite possibly making changes that re-instate things that were in the original draft. Maybe I’m just cynical, but I think it really is just a matter of personal taste – an editor will definitely change your draft, but will they improve it? The exception might be where you’re writing in a particular genre, when an editor may be able to tailor your writing for that genre. The second reason is that it’s just so damned expensive! Bear in mind you’ll have to pay loads of $$$$ to self-publish, and loads more if you want help with marketing and distribution – you’ll need to use your money wisely. I’m going to start a thread on my blog detailing (well, roughly!) my research, and the self-publishing process, so it would be useful to compare notes. Good luck, and try not to be put off by what is a complicated, and potentially expensive, process. Graham

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Avoiding a professional edit may seem attractive, and can certainly save you a lot of money but…. who will be doing the editing? The author cannot do it effectively because the author is too familiar with the writing. Errors will be overlooked. i.e. the brain will fill in the gaps! A friend could do it, but are they qualified/experienced enough to produce a professional product? There is little worse than trying to read something with spelling errors, poor punctuation, and peculiar paragraph breaks etc.
      Please think it through very carefully, and all the very best with this venture. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Simple changes such as spelling, punctuation, etc. is more the realm of a proof reader than an editor. If you don’t have anyone who can help you with that (I’m lucky enough to have a lovely wife who is a fully trained proof-reader!) my guess is that paying for your manuscript to be proof-read would cost a lot less than paying for a full edit, which is much more fundamental. Again, I’m cynical, but I ask myself why an editor would freelance editing manuscripts by would-be writers, many of which are not going to be anywhere near publishable, when they could get a job with a publishing house. The answer has to be money. How many freelance editors would turn down your manuscript if they think it isn’t of a suitable standard?

        Liked by 2 people

        1. Hi Graham – I would agree with you in general. My two books were both professionally edited (and yes it did cost!), but they were not freelance. They were employed by publishing companies (in my case Friesen Press for “Who Said I was up for Adoption?” and Tellwell for “Just Thinking”). Both those companies encourage “self-publishing”, but with their assistance of course and, as their name goes on the cover, I would like to assume some level of integrity! All the best.

          Liked by 1 person

        2. As a freelance editor of over 10 years’ experience, who also works for a publishing house, there are several answers to your question. First, a job with a mainstream publisher is very hard to get. It tends to be a closed shop. There are many reputable and experienced literary editors who have worked with publishing houses but who now freelance. The publisher I work for about 50% of my time is an e-publisher; they of course charge the customer for the editing, take their cut, and pay me. So if you can find an independent literary editor with a good profile, it will cost less and from my experience, having had my first memoir edited by one, it is well worth the money. As for editors, of course they work for money! Who doesn’t? But speaking for myself, I also work for the writer, wanting to help them make their book the best it can be, to have their voice heard. I have helped many to publish and it is a wonderfully satisfying profession. http://www.perfectwordsediting.com/

          Liked by 1 person

    1. There’s nothing to dread about publishing. It does however take some money, a huge, HUGE, amount of time to proof the final edit (kind of like your last chance to get it right!)…. but think of the pleasure of holding your own book in your hands. You will have achieved something that so many people never will.

      Liked by 2 people

  14. Good luck with everything! I’m also a writer currently still very much stick writing my novel, I was wondering though, do you edit and revise a chapter every time you finish it? I know it seems silly, but I really need to know if it actually helps…

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        1. I’m a serial pantser, so I usually start with the most exciting scene and go from there. So I suppose my process is a bit of a mess too! I only ever edit once I write the ENTIRE first draft 🙂 If I edited by chapter (or scene in my case) I’d have a mental break down and would probably never complete anything! The first draft is the most fun I have in the entire process, so I like to keep to free from the strenuous task of editing

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Got it! Thank you for everyone’s sharing on their process, it makes sense now why I can’t seem to finish my complete and actual first draft :p I keep going back and although it’s fun watching my writing improvement, it gets very tedious haha. Again, thanks everyone! I wouldn’t have changed my mind about my process of it weren’t for this 😀

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    1. I’ve usually finished a project before I go back and edit. I’ve found though, working with editors that you pay for that they prefer to see a whole project instead of one chapter at a time (depending on what you’re writing) especially, if you want them to edit for missing plot points, overall story flow.

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  15. How Exciting, Milly! Go for it!!! I’m a bit of a wuss myself, so I understand the nerves. I’m still a long way off the publishing stage at the rate I’m going, if I’m totally honest with myself. But then again, it’s been school holidays since forever and the writing has really suffered. At least I’ve managed to keep with social media this time around!
    I’m looking forward to cheering you on this year! Best of luck! 😻

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Marie!! I think I’m insanely nervous just at the thought of publishing. Luckily, my family have been really encouraging, my mum in particular has been a great support despite reading my dreggy first drafts. She’s always like, ‘Milly, I really think you should publish Mesmerise’ or ‘Milly, when are you publishing your book, the one called Mesmerise?’ OK MUM I’M DOING IT!!

      I’m impressed that you kept up with social media over the school holidays! I think I need to get stuck back into my Instagram as it has really started to suffer, I’m losing followers left, right and centre!

      Good luck with your book, I can’t wait to hear how it goes!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I was surprised how many Instagram followers hung around after my earlier break. I was also surprised at the couple that did leave – after I’d been liking & commenting on their posts all year. Just shows they weren’t genuine after all, and it was a reminder to me to take it all with a grain of salt, and not worry about the numbers. Just use each platform in a way that works for you.

        It sounds like you have an awesome mum! 😊

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  16. Good luck, Milly! Wishing you the best success. Self-publishing hasn’t worked so well on my end, so I am going to keep trying the traditional route. But I’m not very good at social media or marketing or any of that non-writing stuff that self-publishing requires.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Oh, Milly! You’ve so got this! You are certainly not alone with wussiness. I’ve been working on the same novel for years, I keep editing the same chapters. On the plus side my writing has come a long way. The down side? My novel has a long way to go! This is the year I finish, though.

    Good luck getting your novel published! Whoo hoo! By the way, I DO like the premise behind Evie…maybe you should pick that one up again some day!

    Jo-Ann

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I’ve been suffering from a serious case of wussiness for years. I’ve been such a wuss that it took me a long time to give my work to beta readers, let alone submit to competitions. This year though I plan to self-publish, starting with my short stories. I still have a lot to learn and do, but writing has always been a lifelong dream, so I need to just swallow that fear and do it anyway. Best of luck with it all Millie! As you say, all that work will be worth it in the end. I look forward to hearing about your journey.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. Thank you! I agree that negative feedback can be disheartening, especially what I’ve heard when it comes to book reviews. Unfortunately there can be a lot of nasty people out there and sadly that comes with the territory. But there are also a lot of wonderful people, so focus on the positive. Yes, writing is subjective, but there is no excuse for being mean. Don’t let those nasty, negative people bring you down. I wish you the very best of luck!

        Liked by 2 people

  19. Yes, this is our year! I’ll be self-publishing too, and like you I’m saying this year. I’d like to hope “I Know You Like a Murder” will be out before summer, but I’m just saying it’ll be sometime THIS YEAR without a set month because I have no idea how long it’ll take me to figure out this publishing thing lol.

    and ever since that, gosh I’m terrified and ready to back out just about every day lol.

    Hey, keep in touch if you’re struggling to figure something out, maybe it’s something I just figured out – or maybe I’ll be a few steps behind you lol we’ll see.

    But yes, it’s worth it, and this time next year our LinkedIn page will say Author 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  20. I became a published author this year (on the 2nd of January, to be precise) and while I am self-published, that isn’t because my work was rejected by traditional publishers. It’s because I looked at how traditional publishing works and decided I could do better for myself.
    The paperback edition of Restoration Day is being printed and distributed by IngramSpark/LightningSource – it’s available on Amazon, Fishpond, B&N etc etc – and the ebook editions my husband and I will be distributing ourselves, from our own website (just getting the last businessducks in a row now!).
    Self-publishing is probably more profitable and allows you a lot more control, but make no mistake, it’s a lot of work. Good luck!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Oh, and definitely consider your options. There are plenty of ways to self-publish out there, and no one ‘right way’ to do it. (I recommend David Gaughran’s book Let’s Get Digital as an introduction to the field.)
      Figure out what will work best for you and go for it! Allons-y! and also allez-houp!

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Good on you, Milly. I self published a book of poetry in December. I don’t expect much in the way of sales but I’m glad I did it (poetry generally only has small print runs). At least my work is ‘out there’ now. I live in hope that one day I’ll be signed to a proper publisher, but I’m not going to die in a ditch over it. Anyway, I’m glad you’re pursuing your dream. All the best 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  22. Hello Millie. What an interesting self-journey! We have two challenges to meet: the world of publishers and publishing, and our own inner world of self-doubt and desire. Conflict all around, and we can spend years shadow boxing. I am an editor and book reviewer, and have published several stories and essays, and edited a collection of Australian women’s writing. I used to dream of publishing mainstream, but a couple of near misses and many rejections, plus seeing so much that is published that needs editing or binning, and so many good stories that don’t get published, have put me off mainstream publishing, which is commercially driven. It reminds me of the inscription on the gates of Hell, in Dante’s Divine Comedy: Abandon all hope, ye who enter here.
    So, like you, I’m taking the road that was once less travelled, but has become a highway. The only barriers, as I see it, are money and self-belief. You need money, first for editing, as you’ve identified, and second for the publishing itself, and as I’m not into doing all the tech stuff myself, it is not cheap. I do know a good e-publisher, whom I do a lot of editing work for, and I have a good literary editor, (it’s always good to get someone else to edit your work) so now it’s just cash. E-publishing is democratic, but inevitably, a lot of bad writing gets published, so these last steps are important.

    Liked by 2 people

  23. I’m so excited for you and can’t wait to read your book!
    I, too, have been a big wuss for far too long. I decided in December that 2018 will be my year. Now, I’m not going the self-publishing route initially so my goal is a little different. I want to be agented or have at least submitted to as many agents for representation as humanly possible. It’s not easy lately but I want it so bad and won’t let my own self-doubt steal my dreams away. Not anymore.
    Best of luck to you, Milly!

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Hey Milly,
    I have self-published one book on Amazon, will soon publish my second book, and have plans to do at least 3 more. My blog tells how to do it frugally–take a look at frugalauthor.wordpress.com. I think you have already been there and have left a comment or two.
    If you’re interested, perhaps we could be beta-reader buddies for works before publication, or we could post reviews on each other’s books once they are published. Let me know what you think. Thanks!
    –Brian

    Liked by 1 person

  25. I’m all for the some and more wine hang but being serious, self publishing is why I created my blog/website. There are a few people/websites tj at are relatively inexpensive for editing. I just sent my editor the first third of my novel and I’m sitting anxiously by my phone to hear back. But this year, I am demanding it. For me it’s hard because I work full time in the military and have other things going on, but thankfully this is my only hobby hahaha. We are in this together

    Liked by 1 person

  26. This is my first comment on anyone’s blog. It is also the first time I ever pressed the “Like” button on anyone’s blog. I guess I am a shy blogger and am not sure of what I am doing and even less sure of the proper etiquette. I am trying to learn how to behave in this new but very interesting world. I did enjoy your post and can identify with the issues you are experiencing. I have read some excellent self-published books. The estimate I have come across was spending $5,000 for editing, cover art, etc. to do a decent self-publishing effort. That is based on a sample of 2, so take it with a grain of salt. I have now information on whether or not the authors recouped any or all of it. It can be an expensive hobby. I have completed a first draft of a first novel and am not happy with it. I know the second draft be a lot better as I am learning a lot along the way. I haven’t faced the indie decision yet, but that is probably the direction I will go. Hang in there and don’t give up. Many aspiring authors never get to where you are now. Best of luck.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Based on my experience, your $5000.00 is probably pretty accurate, although experience can trim that for a second book. My first book “Who Said I was up for Adoption?” totaled $5800.00Cdn. My second book “Just Thinking” cost a total of $3800.00Cdn. As for recouping those costs? Unless one gets into professional marketing (big additional expense), then I think that is not likely to ever recoup the full value. Of course, the more books one publishes, the more opportunities will present themselves.
      My pleasure comes from knowing that I have two books published, both of which are being enjoyed. The financial aspects have to be considered as simply a means to an end…. the end being having books out in the market place!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Go you, Milly! It takes a hell of a lot of courage to take your baby out into the Big Wide World, and I really hope that you find success with it!
    I’m nowhere near this stage myself, but I’ll be following your adventures with editing and such as you experience them with much interest. Fingers crosses for you all the way!
    If you have the energy and will, I’d be fascinated to know how you decide what stays and what goes in your work, and what you might do with discarded ideas. Have you ever had a time when you looked at a really minor idea and realised it had loads more potential than you realised?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am getting ready to publish at least a few Author copies of my Mg. book. I have sent it out there and now I feel like I need it in my hands to sell it. My beta readers have not been real helpful because they all just say the like the story. So Create Space here I come.

      Liked by 1 person

  28. You can do it.. you can do it.. so do it!

    I have 4 stories on the go, and none of them are finished, so you are away ahead of me.

    Thought: perhaps people are un-successful (In the completion process at least) because they don’t put a deadline on it..

    I’ll stay tuned in for news of your book in the future.. best of luck.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. I really enjoy reading your posts! I’m in the same predicament but I’ve told myself to just do it. I’m fearful, but I’m curious to see how it will turn out if I actually applied myself. I think you would do great work and I’m eager to read what you have in store!

    Liked by 1 person

  30. You will succeed, 1/ Download the free Grammarly, it is great for the first edit then use beta readers.
    2/ Download the free style guides from Smashwords, Createspace and KDP, they also have free templates, SW and CS offer a free ISBN, Do not use KDP select unless you only want to publish with them and CS, Smashwords have the largest distribution network.
    Self Publishing is easy, really.
    Enjoy the wine.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Funnily enough, I already use the free grammarly! It’s great. I actually used it before I went through my first round of beta readers. I’m going to have to go through the whole process again though as my book underwent some MAJOR revisions, it’s almost like I’m at editing step #1 again!

      I’ve been warned off KDP select before by a few authors, so I will definitely not go there. Smashwords is the only thing I haven’t researched yet, so that will be my next task. Thanks!!

      And yes, I will enjoy the wine 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  31. Your final paragraph says it all, and must be your driving force. After you have that glorious hard copy in your hand, and feel pleased with yourself (and quite justifiably so), you have to market your book.
    People cannot buy a book that they do not know exists… and there is the challenge but, refer back to your final paragraph and if 1 copy sells periodically, then celebrate because you will have achieved something that so many others only dream about.
    Go for it with all the enthusiasm you can muster! 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

      1. Just a note. KDP is not a life sentence. I think it is a short term thing to be just with them. Also Ingram spark is a part of Ingram, which is one of the biggest distributors. Worth the investigation.

        Like

  32. Hi Milly – You can do it! Sure, it’s a ton of work, but doing something you love is so rewarding. I’ll be watching to see how it all turns out. Good luck! (FYI: My 12th book is coming out on Monday so I know a little bit about the fear. This too shall pass)

    Liked by 1 person

  33. Good Luck Milly!

    It’s not going to be an easy journey (2017 has opened my eyes to the true effort behind publishing a novel to a high level off your own back) but you are right highly rewarding!
    I’m aiming to publish this year myself and wish you all the best in your journey! 🙂

    Never give up and your efforts will pay off!

    Liked by 1 person

  34. Dude, at least you have a plan. I started what turned into my epic novella lol from a narrative poem in 1998! No lie. I finished it two summers ago. (It obviously was NOT on the forefront of my life.) I put it down and picked it back so many times that, dammit, by now, it BETTER be good. lol

    Liked by 1 person

  35. Hi Milly—I self-published two books in 2016 and it is NOT easy. There is this misconception that self-published works are of lower quality than trad pubbed books but that’s not always the case.

    If you’re interested in the process, I have a free webinar that covers the process at a high level—bit.ly/designbeautifulbooks.

    I also have a self-publishing course for beginners that goes into greater depth and provides a comprehensive blueprint. Definitely, definitely hire an editor. They are worth every penny.

    I have no doubt that you will put out a great book. Stay focused and stay motivated. You can do it!

    Liked by 1 person

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